DisAbled Women's Network Ontario Home Page
Text Version of the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
What's New on the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario site
DisAbled Women's Network Ontario Resources on Women with Disabilities
Online Publications relevant to Women with Disabilities
Justice Issues relevant to Women with Disabilities
Health Issues relevant to Women with Disabilities
DisAbled Women's Network Ontario Inclusion Leadership Award
DisAbled Women's Network Ontario ACCESS Checklist
DisAbled Women's Network Ontario Online Discussion List About Issues relevant to Women with Disabilities
Research Postings on the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario site
Who We Are - About DAWN Ontario - DisAbled Women's Network  Ontario
What the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario Does
Vision of DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
Story of the DisAbled Women's Network
Fact Sheet on Women with Disabilities
Chapters of the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
Membership Form to Join the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
Join the Discussion List for Women With DisAbilities
Please Sign the Guestbook of the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
Follow this link to provide Feedback on the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario website
Contact Information of the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
Alphabetical Links Page of the DisAbled Women's Network Ontario
Our Credits Page
Canada Flag image
DisAbled Women's Network: DAWN ONTARIO

 

HUMAN RIGHTS
Women wth disAbilities


Source: Women's Human Rights Net

reprinted with permission from WHRNet

 

 
Human Rights - Women with disAbilities


According to the UN World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons, there are about 500 million persons with disabilities in the world today. In most countries, at least one person in 10 is disabled by physical, mental or sensory impairment.

Further, as many as 80 per cent of all disabled people live in isolated rural areas in the developing countries. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that most live in areas where medical and other related services are very scarce and where disabilities cannot be detected early on.

To a great extent, people with disabilities everywhere contend with physical, cultural and social barriers, which constrain their lives and limit their opportunities, even if rehabilitation assistance and other supports are available.

The UN Declaration of the Rights of Disabled Persons (1975) proclaims the right of all persons with disabilities to all human rights including: the right to self-reliance and to "medical, psychological and functional treatment," the right to social security, to having special needs taken into account in social and economic planning, to protection from all forms of exploitation, and the right to be informed of their rights.


Key Concepts

The consequences of discrimination against, and inadequate provision for, the disabled are particularly serious for women. Women are often subjected to social, cultural and economic disadvantages which impede their access to health care, education, vocational training and employment. If they are also physically or mentally disabled, women's chances of overcoming the disability are diminished because of sexism, which makes it all the more difficult for them to take part further in community life.

Furthermore, in families, the responsibility for caring for a disabled parent, child or other family member often lies with women. This considerably limits their freedom and their possibilities of taking part in other activities. According to the Canadian Council on Disability, there are few educational opportunities for disabled girls and when there are opportunities for education, in special schools, boys usually receive them.

In addition, women with disabilities experience a high incidence of abuse -- physical, emotional and sexual. Since most disabled women are hidden away in homes, this often happens within the family.


Human Rights Mechanisms

The Women's Convention (CEDAW) with its remit to fight all forms of discrimination is a valuable tool for advancing the rights of women with disabilities. Specifically, General Recommendation No.18 adopted by the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination in 1991, calls on states to "provide information on disabled women in their periodic reports, and on measures taken to deal with their particular situation."

The Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities is the primary international mechanism for advancing the human rights of people with disabilities. However, there is a lack of gender-specific analyses, recommendations, and actions in the monitoring of disability rights. In the Final report of the Special Rapporteur of the Commission for Social Development on Monitoring the Implementation of the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, it is noted that:

Both the child and the gender perspective are vague in the texts of the Rules. Both the needs of the child and the gender perspective should receive more attention in future implementation efforts.

More generally, UN Declaration of the Rights of Disabled Persons (1975), the UN World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons (1982) and Towards a society for all: Long-term Strategy to Implement the World Programme of Action concerning Disabled Persons to the Year 2000 and Beyond are important documents in human rights advocacy by and for people with disabilities.

Source: Women's Human Rights Net

Pinpoint URL: WHRNet's Women with Disabilities Human Rights



Top of page Top of page


Website designed & maintained courtesy of Barbara Anello